Pray for daylight...

ameliacarina:

how do you say ‘please talk to me more i crave your company’ to someone without sounding like a creep

“‘m’on over, dey fuck!” - how you say it in my ‘hood.

"Life is much easier when you have nothing to steal." - Francine Jay, upon finding her house had been robbed of an empty purse, a $3 of canadian change, a lipstick, and a CD walkman.

wocinsolidarity:

odinsblog:

#myNYPD

the OOP heard around the world

Don't you ever get overheated in the summer because of all the black clothes?
Anonymous

victoriashaunting:

nope, there’s such things at short sleeves and short skirts/dresses/shorts 

first i was like “heat? summer?” then I realised “australia” then I was jealous.

softwaring:

The NYPD tried to start a hashtag outpouring of positive memories with their police force. 

If this were ever a bad idea, it was probably the worst idea for arguably the most corrupt police force in America. 

via Vice

Lisbeth chasing a light

mostfamousunknown:

ohitsjustgreg:

imsoshive:

thefemaleandblack:

kentrippy:

help

Everyone watch this

😂😂

Geezus u was appalled until the end

THE FULL VIDEO!!!!!!! hahahahahahahaaaa

Why is American Vogue not as good as Vogue in other countries?
Anonymous

prayforprada:

because its a lifestyle magazine and not a fashion magazine 

pyrrhics:

Favourites: Nicola Samorì was born in Forlì on 13th May 1977. After graduating from the Academy of Fine Arts in Bologna, the artist has exhibited since 1998 both in Italy and abroad. His early solo shows of note include that held at Santa Maria delle Croci (Ravenna) and at the Tafe Gallery in Perth (Australia).
In 2002 he stripped his work of all its narrative markers to give way to the first great torn posters, printed with monotype on canvas, along with his works on metal, oriented from the start towards a reappraisal of 17th-century Dutch and Bolognese painting. The subjects are remote inventions that refer to nothing other than themselves: copperplate nightmares zooming in on the body. A new turning point was offered by his dialogue with sculpture, in which he favoured the practice of moulage, adopted as a medium through which to sound out the border between the living and the dead, between the moving and the inert. This was the beginning of his first molossus heads, dating back to 2004, followed by a long series of anti-portraits that turn the gaze inwards, leaving the vast stretches of skin to face the clash between the teachings of non-representational and its antithesis: a form of painting analytical to the point of paroxysm. Nicola Samorì lives and works in Bagnacavallo in the province of Ravenna

Anthony, As a long time fan of industrial music I feel the genre built by acts like Throbbing Gristle, SPK, Einstürzende Neubauten, etc. has given way to brainless club-fodder, favouring a lack of experimentation in sound or thoughtfulness in message (see: Nachtmahr, Faderhead, CombiChrist, etc.) While the emergence of industrial hip-hop has proven something of a relief, I can't help but feel it will be shortly lived. tl;dr: your thoughts on genre entropy?

noisepunk:

krokodil-chic:

noisepunk:

theneedledrop:

i think “industrial hip hop” could possibly be a short-lived trend; however, i think artists like death grips and clipping have broken the flood gates in terms of free experimentation with the sound of the genre. even after they’re gone, there will still be artists looking for new ways to fudge with the blueprint. it might not be “industrial,” but they’ve proven that you can amass an audience with an unorthodox approach.

Industrial purists always compare post-industrial styles to the most derivative acts. There’s plenty of worthwhile EBM, aggrotech, electro-industrial, and industrial rock acts, or whatever else. I feel like a scene or idea becomes inert when people want it to stay in the niche created by the pioneers. Keep in mind that Throbbing Gristle/Psychic TV/Coil and Cabaret Voltaire went on to make “club fodder” in their later careers. Most of the pioneers went on and kept experimenting instead of becoming inert. There’s plenty of industrial dance music that’s quite the opposite of brainless, such as Front Line Assembly, Post-‘The Process’ Skinny Puppy, KMFDM, and Twitch-era Ministry. There will always be lackluster artists in a particular style, but to ignore the good is to kill the scene.

thank you also for the pm; I love you too. all that aside, any groups that emerged in the last couple of years you can recommend me? thanks x

Yeah sorry I wasn’t thinking, I figuratively blurted it out.

Tomorrow The Rain Falls Upwards is promising, but they only have an EP out right now. Yvette is great industrial rock act. Pharmakon is up there and new, but you might already know about them. Carter Tutti Void is a newish collab, with older people, still a good listen. October File is one of my favorites, they had a double album with half of it produced by Justin Broadrick. And of course a lot of older artists are doing newer things with a completely different sound, including Snog, Skinny Puppy, Foetus, and Gary Numan. I’d also consider Trust to be futurepop, they’re a good modern act, but as far away from industrial as an ‘industrial music’ act can get.

Got Pharmakon somewhere; I picked up a load of Sacred Bones stuff a while ago and will be giving it a spin soon. Will also check the other stuff you’ve mentioned out. Thanks :)
noctex:

N OC T E X - Omnia Long Sleeve// do not remove source

noctex:

N OC T E X - Omnia Long Sleeve
// do not remove source

Anthony, As a long time fan of industrial music I feel the genre built by acts like Throbbing Gristle, SPK, Einstürzende Neubauten, etc. has given way to brainless club-fodder, favouring a lack of experimentation in sound or thoughtfulness in message (see: Nachtmahr, Faderhead, CombiChrist, etc.) While the emergence of industrial hip-hop has proven something of a relief, I can't help but feel it will be shortly lived. tl;dr: your thoughts on genre entropy?

noisepunk:

theneedledrop:

i think “industrial hip hop” could possibly be a short-lived trend; however, i think artists like death grips and clipping have broken the flood gates in terms of free experimentation with the sound of the genre. even after they’re gone, there will still be artists looking for new ways to fudge with the blueprint. it might not be “industrial,” but they’ve proven that you can amass an audience with an unorthodox approach.

Industrial purists always compare post-industrial styles to the most derivative acts. There’s plenty of worthwhile EBM, aggrotech, electro-industrial, and industrial rock acts, or whatever else. I feel like a scene or idea becomes inert when people want it to stay in the niche created by the pioneers. Keep in mind that Throbbing Gristle/Psychic TV/Coil and Cabaret Voltaire went on to make “club fodder” in their later careers. Most of the pioneers went on and kept experimenting instead of becoming inert. There’s plenty of industrial dance music that’s quite the opposite of brainless, such as Front Line Assembly, Post-‘The Process’ Skinny Puppy, KMFDM, and Twitch-era Ministry. There will always be lackluster artists in a particular style, but to ignore the good is to kill the scene.

thank you also for the pm; I love you too. all that aside, any groups that emerged in the last couple of years you can recommend me? thanks x
Anthony, As a long time fan of industrial music I feel the genre built by acts like Throbbing Gristle, SPK, Einstürzende Neubauten, etc. has given way to brainless club-fodder, favouring a lack of experimentation in sound or thoughtfulness in message (see: Nachtmahr, Faderhead, CombiChrist, etc.) While the emergence of industrial hip-hop has proven something of a relief, I can't help but feel it will be shortly lived. tl;dr: your thoughts on genre entropy?

theneedledrop:

i think “industrial hip hop” could possibly be a short-lived trend; however, i think artists like death grips and clipping have broken the flood gates in terms of free experimentation with the sound of the genre. even after they’re gone, there will still be artists looking for new ways to fudge with the blueprint. it might not be “industrial,” but they’ve proven that you can amass an audience with an unorthodox approach.